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Find an article using an online database

What is "Database Search"?

"Database Search" combines all of Grossmont College Library's online article databases together, so that they are searchable all at one time.

And what are online article databases?  They are also called periodical indexes, subscription databases, or “full text” databases - and they are used to find articles published in magazines, journals, or newspapers (Magazines, journals, and newspapers are also known as “periodicals”, since they are published on a periodical basis, such as monthly, weekly or daily). 

A particular database may contain records of articles that show one, a combination, or all of the following:   

Citations: information used to locate the article in print (such as journal title and date) Example:

Title: Vatican Tells U.N. War Did Not Make World Safer.
Source: America; 10/18/2004, Vol. 191 Issue 11, p4, 1p, 1c

      

Abstracts: summaries of the articles  - Example:

Abstract: This article reports on Archbishop Giovanni Lajalo's address to the United Nations. Addressing the United Nations, Archbishop Lajalo said the war in Iraq did not make the world safer and that defeating terrorism will require multilateral cooperation that goes beyond short-term military operations. Archbishop Lajolo, the Vatican's top foreign affairs official, made the remarks on Sept. 29 in a speech to the U.N. General Assembly. Archbishop Lajolo offered a far-ranging review of Vatican positions on peace and justice issues, saying global poverty must be the number one priority for the United Nations and all international agencies. Turning to Iraq, Archbishop Lajolo(Archbishop Giovanni Lajolo) said the Vatican's opposition to military action in Iraq in 2002-3 was well known. Archbishop Lajolo addressed several other major international issues. The archbishop reiterated the Vatican's call for a comprehensive ban on human cloning, saying that the Vatican supports procurement of adult stem cells, as opposed to cells taken from human embryos. Archbishop Lajolo also raised the question of U.N. internal reform aimed at increasing its peacekeeping effectiveness around the world.

 

Full text: the complete article - Example:

Vatican Tells U.N. War Did Not Make World Safer

Addressing the United Nations, a leading Vatican official said the war in Iraq did not make the world safer and that defeating terrorism will require multilateral cooperation that goes beyond short-term military operations. Archbishop Giovanni Lajolo, the Vatican's top foreign affairs official, made the remarks on Sept. 29 in a speech to the U.N. General Assembly. Archbishop Lajolo offered a far-ranging review of Vatican positions on peace and justice issues, saying global poverty must be the number one priority for the United Nations and all international agencies. "The urgency of the situation cannot tolerate delay," he said. He noted that hundreds of millions of people are living below the threshold of what is necessary, and tens of millions of children are undernourished.

Turning to Iraq, Archbishop Lajolo said the Vatican's opposition to military action in Iraq in 2002-3 was well known. "Everyone can see that it did not lead to a safer world either inside or outside Iraq," he said. Under the present circumstance, he added, the Vatican believes it is imperative to support the provisional Iraqi government as it tries to bring the country to normality and establish a political system that is "substantially democratic and in harmony with the values of its historic traditions."

He called terrorism an "aberrant phenomenon, utterly unworthy of man," which today threatens all countries. While every nation has the right to protect its citizens, he said, "it seems obvious that terrorism can only be effectively challenged through a concerted multilateral approach...and not through the politics of unilateralism.

"No one is in any doubt that the fight against terrorism means, first and foremost, neutralizing its active breeding grounds. But the underlying causes are many and complex: political, social, cultural, religious," he said; for that reason, even more important is long-term action directed at terrorism's roots and designed to stop it from spreading.

Archbishop Lajolo addressed several other major international issues:

• On disarmament, he called for severe and effective international controls on the production and sale of conventional weapons. He praised U.N. efforts to date, but said "huge economic interests" remain as obstacles. Weapons of mass destruction and their possible use represent a separate problem, the archbishop said. But he reminded the assembly that conventional weapons are being used in "numerous armed conflicts that stain the world in blood" and in terrorism.

• The Palestinian-Israeli conflict, he said, will require not only justice but also mutual forgiveness, which requires greater courage than the use of weapons. He called for a return to the "road map" peace plan, which has been formally accepted by both parties.

• Conflicts in Sudan, Somalia, the Great Lakes region of Africa, Ivory Coast and elsewhere call for greater international attention and authoritative intervention by the African Union, he said.

• The right to life has special application in the issue of human cloning, Archbishop Lajolo said. The United Nations is scheduled to debate it this fall. The archbishop reiterated the Vatican's call for a comprehensive ban on human cloning, saying that the Vatican supports procurement of adult stem cells, as opposed to cells taken from human embryos.

• Archbishop Lajolo also raised the question of U.N. internal reform aimed at increasing its peacekeeping effectiveness around the world. In general, he said, the United Nations needs more room to operate before conflicts begin. He suggested that the United Nations be given "special prerogatives to facilitate action to prevent conflicts at times of international crisis, and also, when absolutely necessary, 'humanitarian intervention'-that is, action aimed at disarming the aggressor."

PHOTO (COLOR): Giovanni Lajolo

 

Where is the article if it is not full-text in the database?
If an article is NOT available “full text” in the database, it may be available in a printed  periodical at Grossmont Library, or from another library, such as SDSU, via Interlibrary Loan (ILL). 

Can students use the databases to research from off-campus?
Grossmont Library subscribes to article databases, meaning the library pays for students to have access to them.  If you try to access these databases from off campus, you will be asked for a username and password, which are the same as your Grossmont College Email username and password. 

Next, you are going to enter keywords that describe your topic in the text entry box and press the Search button.  Before you do, however, you may want to use some of the following electronic search tips: Boolean operators, and/or Phrase/adjacency searching.  Also, here is a handy tips sheet to read and/or print out.  

Once you have performed your search, you will get a list of records to periodical articles, with the most current one listed first. 

What is Boolean logic?

Boolean logic operators enable better search results by combining search terms.
The principal Boolean operators are: AND, OR, and NOT

Use AND to combine different concepts together. This will reduce search results.
      Example:  adolescents AND volunteers

Use OR to gather references that use similar terms or synonyms. This will increase search results.
      Example:  adolescents OR teens OR young adults

Use NOT to exclude terms. Use this sparingly as it may remove useful search results.
      Example:  adolescents NOT teens

Phrase or Adjacency Searching

Some databases—and search engines—will enable you to search for an exact phrase or words in the same sentence or paragraph (called proximity searching).  Remember, the computer will search for the terms exactly as they are entered.

Example: Searching for “teenage volunteers” may miss a source that uses the words adolescent voluntarism.

 

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